OKAPI Spotlight- October 2008

Every month, OKAPI Spotlight features Open Knowledge news at UC Berkeley and around the world. To contribute, email Lizzy. To receive more frequent updates, join our email listserv.

ON CAMPUS

Free Culture Conference 2008
October 11th and 12th, 2008
International House, UC Berkeley
http://conference.freeculture.org/
Organized by Students for Free Culture (SFC), ‘a diverse, non-partisan group of students and young people who are working to get their peers involved in the free culture movement,’ the Free Culture Conference will focus on technology, remixing, copyright, open source and free software, and of course, free culture. The keynote speakers are Professor Lawrence Lessig, Professor Pamela Samuelson, and John Lilly, CEO of Mozilla. The conference will also comprise of “talks, workshops, activism, and parties.” There will also be a video and photo booth. Anyone interested in or is a part of the Free Culture movement is invited. Registration is based on how much” attendees think the value of admissions is worth.”

The Future of Service Science
Paul Maglio
October 8, 2008: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Location: 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building, UC Berkeley Campus
http://www.citris-uc.org/RE-Oct8
Paul Maglio, Adjunct Associate Professor of Cognitive Science at UC Merced, will be discussing the rapid development of Service Science, which is the “study of service systems.” Service Science focuses on the “configurations of people, technologies, and other resources that interact with others to create mutual value… [and]  aims to develop theory and practice around service innovation.”

Tracking Transience: The Orwell Project
Hasan Elahi
October 13, 2008: 7:30
160 Kroeber Hall
http://trackingtransience.net
Part of UC Berkeley’s ongoing Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium, “Tracking Transience: the Orwell Project” is a result of a post-9/11 FBI investigation in which Hasan Elahi, the artist, was forced to undergo many months of interrogations and multiple lie-detector tests. After this experience, Elahi created this “self-tracking system,  [which] constantly and publicly presents his exact location, activities, and other personal data” on the Internet.

Open Access Day at Berkeley
Tuesday, October 14
6:30pm – 8:30pm
FSM Café, Moffitt Library
http://blogs.lib.berkeley.edu/scholcomm.php/2008/09/16/open-access-day-berkeley
“Open Access is a growing international movement based on the principle that publicly funded research should be freely accessible online, immediately upon publication. Find out more about open access and how to throw open the locked doors that once hid knowledge at a special, international event sponsored by the Free Speech Movement Educational Series, the UC Berkeley Library and the Berkeley chapter of the Students for Free Culture. Featuring Professors Michael Eisen (UCB), Philip Bourne (UCSD) and student videos. Free food and drink! Prizes and giveaways! Find out more about open access at: Hot Topics: Open Access and at Open Access Day.”

The Evolving Concept of “Digital Libraries”
Michael Buckland, Ray Larson, and Clifford Lynch
Friday, October 10, 2008, 3:00pm-5:00pm
107 South Hall
http://www.ischool.berkeley.edu/about/events/20081010ias
Part of the Information Access Seminar, which occur every Friday in South Hall, Michael Buckland, Ray Larson, and Clifford Lunch will be discussing “The Evolving Concept of “Digital Libraries.”

AROUND THE WORLD

Number of cell phone subscribers to hit 4 billion this year, UN says
http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.php-URL_ID=27530&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html
According to the United Nations, there are now 4 billion cell phone subscribers in the world. This “‘indicates that it is technically feasible to connect the world to the benefits of ICT [information and communication technology] and that it is a visible business opportunity,’ ITU Secretary-General Hamadoun Touré said in New York at a high-level event on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), eight anti-poverty targets agreed upon by world leaders in 2000.” According to this article, developing economies (e.g Russia, India, China), are responsible for the growing number of cellphone subscriptions.

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